Stop, Drop & Roll!

September 20, 2013

Posted in: Children

You know the drill – a fire alarm sounds and you make your way to the nearest exit. But would you know what to do if a fire started in your home? Would your kids? Toddlers and preschoolers are old enough to learn the basics of fire safety and should practice what to do in an emergency. When taught simple fire facts, kids are better able to protect themselves. October is Fire Prevention Month and the perfect season to teach your children the fundamentals of fire safety!

Check out these ideas to introduce fire safety to your little ones in a fun and educational way:

  • Tour your local fire station: Almost all fire stations welcome tours by families making it a great opportunity to introduce the concept of fire safety. Sure, kids will be excited to see the big red trucks in person, but they’re also likely to take away a great learning experience from the visit (just be sure to remind the firefighter giving the tour that you’re teaching the young ones about safety). It’s also a great character education opportunity, as kids themselves can pretend to be a firefighter for the day!
  • Play games: Stop, Drop & Roll is a lifesaving technique that can be turned into a game, making it less scary for little kids. Maybe it’s something you do once a month after dinner time. Have your family spread out in a general space and begin moving. Take turns calling out “STOP, DROP, and ROLL” and mimic each action. Children need to be aware of what to do should they see flames on their clothes.
  • Fire Drills: Make a family plan and practice it! Children aren’t always aware when the smoke alarm sounds. Know what your children will do before a fire occurs. Get more information on smoke alarms and escape planning atwww.nfpa.org/factsheets.

Of course, the best way to practice fire safety is to make sure a fire doesn’t break out in the first place. Sparky the Fire Dog® can help your child become an official safety inspector using this kid-friendly checklist! They’ll need to ask a grown-up for help.

More Information on Fire Safety: